Official Press Release from OSU:

INDIANAPOLIS - Five football student-athletes from The Ohio State University must sit out the first five games of the 2011 season for selling awards, gifts and university apparel and receiving improper benefits in 2009, the NCAA has determined.

A sixth football student-athlete must sit out the first game in 2011 for receiving discounted services in violation of NCAA rules.

The violations fall under the NCAA’s preferential treatment bylaws.

In addition to missing five games next season, student-athletes Mike Adams, Dan Herron, DeVier Posey, Terrelle Pryor and Solomon Thomas must repay money and benefits ranging in value from $1,000 to $2,500. The repayments must be made to a charity.

Student-athlete Jordan Whiting must sit out the first game next year and pay $150 to a charity for the value of services that were discounted because of his status as a student-athlete.

“These are significant penalties based on findings and information provided by the university,” said Kevin Lennon, NCAA vice president of academic and membership affairs.

The decision from the NCAA student-athlete reinstatement staff does not include a withholding condition for the Allstate Sugar Bowl. The withholding condition was suspended and the student-athletes will be eligible to play in the bowl game Jan. 4 based on several factors.
These include the acknowledgment the student-athletes did not receive adequate rules education during the time period the violations occurred, Lennon said.

NCAA policy allows suspending withholding penalties for a championship or bowl game if it was reasonable at the time the student-athletes were not aware they were committing violations, along with considering the specific circumstances of each situation. In addition, there must not be any competitive advantage related to the violations, and the student-athletes must have eligibility remaining.

The policy for suspending withholding conditions for bowl games or NCAA championship competition recognizes the unique opportunity these events provide at the end of a season, and they are evaluated differently from a withholding perspective. In this instance, the facts are consistent with the established policy, Lennon said.

Gene Smith, associate vice president and director of athletics at Ohio State, said the university will “further enhance” its rules education in the future based on this situation.

“We were not as explicit with our student-athlete education as we should have been in the 2007-08 and 2008-09 academic years regarding the sale of apparel, awards and gifts issued by the athletics department,” Smith said. “We began to significantly improve our education in November of 2009 to address these issues. After going through this experience, we will further enhance our education for all our student-athletes as we move forward.”

The standard withholding condition in cases like these involving the five student-athletes is four games, or 30 percent of a season. A fifth game was added to the penalty because these student-athletes did not immediately disclose the violations when presented with the appropriate rules education, Lennon said.

“Once a student-athlete understands a violation has occurred, they must immediately come forward to report it,” he said. “That did not happen, so the additional one-game penalty was imposed.”

The university declared the student-athletes ineligible on Monday (Dec. 20) and requested reinstatement from the NCAA.

As part of their reinstatement, Adams must repay $1,000 for selling his 2008 Big Ten championship ring and Herron must repay $1,150 for selling his football jersey, pants and shoes for $1,000 and receiving discounted services worth $150.

Posey must repay $1,250 for selling his 2008 Big Ten championship ring for $1,200 and receiving discounted services worth $50, while Pryor must repay $2,500 for selling his 2008 Big Ten championship ring, a 2009 Fiesta Bowl sportsmanship award and his 2008 Gold Pants, a gift from the university.

Solomon must repay $1,505 for selling his 2008 Big Ten championship ring for $1,000, his 2008 Gold Pants for $350 and receiving discounted services worth $155.

During the reinstatement process, each case is evaluated based on the specific facts of the particular case by NCAA staff. Prior to reaching a decision, staff considers any guidelines
established by the Committee on Student-Athlete Reinstatement, a student-athlete’s responsibility for the violation, as well as any mitigating factors presented by the institution.

The university can appeal the decision to the Division I NCAA Committee on Student-Athlete Reinstatement, an independent committee comprised of representatives from NCAA member colleges, universities and athletic conferences. This committee can reduce or remove the condition, but it cannot increase the staff-imposed conditions.

Reinstatement decisions are independent of the NCAA enforcement process and typically are made once the facts of the student-athlete’s involvement are determined. The reinstatement process is likely to conclude prior to the close of an enforcement investigation. It is NCAA policy not to comment on current, pending or potential investigations.
 


Comments

Hocking Hick
12/23/2010 09:45

F them. Dump them all now and start over.

Nobody sells their Gold Pants.

If they are still there next year, Tress loses any respect and I won't watch a game.

They are trash and scum. To the gutter with them now, 'cause that is where they will end up.


"As part of their reinstatement, Adams must repay $1,000 for selling his 2008 Big Ten championship ring and Herron must repay $1,150 for selling his football jersey, pants and shoes for $1,000 and receiving discounted services worth $150.

Posey must repay $1,250 for selling his 2008 Big Ten championship ring for $1,200 and receiving discounted services worth $50, while Pryor must repay $2,500 for selling his 2008 Big Ten championship ring, a 2009 Fiesta Bowl sportsmanship award and his 2008 Gold Pants, a gift from the university.

Solomon must repay $1,505 for selling his 2008 Big Ten championship ring for $1,000, his 2008 Gold Pants for $350 and receiving discounted services worth $155."

Reply
12/23/2010 10:27

HH: Sure I am ticked at them for breaking rules and hurting the team but you are way too harsh. Some of these kids come out of tought economic situations and watch the school and NCAA get rich off of them while they and their families struggle. Plus they are very young and we all do stupid things in our youth. I hope you never need grace or forgiveness my friend - but I have and am thankful I received it.

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Hocking Hick
12/23/2010 10:55

Sorry, that's bs.

They sold their Gold Pants.

Grace and forgivness are for serious life-stuff (sickness, death, etc...) -- not college football, where pampered athletes game the system over and over and have excuses made for them by well-meaning (or blindly loyal) chumps like yourself.

And while I'm at it, fire Gene Smith.

Not for not minding the store, but for making childishly stupid comments and excuses.

Reply
Hocking Hick
12/23/2010 10:59

Not that you need the education, but you might need reminding:

http://www.coachtressel.com/tradition/gold_pants.php

Reply
12/23/2010 11:04

Dude: You need to go seek help. Whenever people can't argue rationally they call names. I am far from blindly loyal and if you read this blog regularly you would know that. But I also know that life is not always black and white. Why do you need to forgive someone who died or is sick? You forgive people who screw up. I don;t blame you for being angry - so am I. But thankfully I can be ticked and logical at the same time.

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BuckeyeDash7
12/23/2010 11:28

Hocking Hick - I'm pissed too...but seriously get a grip. Fan like you need a life and need some perspective...

HOLY S*** WHERE'S THE TYLENOL?!!!

Reply
Hocking Hick
12/23/2010 11:31

I am seeking help. From you. A guy who still uses the term "dude". God help me...

Again, this is not life and death. These guys did wrong, and it was a wrong that was identified and explained to them. Just got done listening to the Spielman interview. They knew the rules and they deserve the max penalty.

Terrelle Pryor SOLD HIS GOLD PANTS.

What more is there to say?

He's now officially too stupid to be a pro QB.

Might still make wide receiver. After all in OSUs offense he can already identify at least two routes.

Reply
Chris
12/23/2010 11:56

Hocking Hick...

They didn't beat up someone. They didn't smoke pot or sell drugs. They didn't get a prostitute. They weren't in a fight.

THEY SOLD SOME OF THEIR OWN STUFF FOR EXTRA CASH!

Admit it, you just hate Pryor. There are no other explanations for your reaction.

Reply
buckeyenut
12/23/2010 12:01

Selling the gold pants and sportsmanship award are pretty low. Just sayin...

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Hocking Hick
12/23/2010 12:03

What a bunch of homer weasles you guys are.

Take your medicine. Maybe the program will be better off without all the tats and stuff that goes with it.

You don't get it: They sold their GOLD PANTS. Do you not have any sense of history????

Jerseys and shoes, I couldn't give a crap about. Even the Champ rings.

They sold their GOLD PANTS.

Reply
12/23/2010 12:19

HH...you have every right to be mad. We all are. It was stupid...and in many ways may just define all of their careers at tOSU.

But please quit calling players scum and trash. And please quit picking fights with other fans.

We are on the same side. We understand the same history as you do.

Reply



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